music industry – Evolution International http://evolutioninternational.net/ Fri, 18 Mar 2022 21:16:12 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://evolutioninternational.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/icon-120x120.jpg music industry – Evolution International http://evolutioninternational.net/ 32 32 Stabbing Westward Frontman adds insight into the band’s 2002 breakup https://evolutioninternational.net/stabbing-westward-frontman-adds-insight-into-the-bands-2002-breakup/ Fri, 18 Mar 2022 20:25:10 +0000 https://evolutioninternational.net/stabbing-westward-frontman-adds-insight-into-the-bands-2002-breakup/ Stabbing Westward is back with chasing ghosts, their brand new album, which is out today (March 18), and is their first since 2001. To commemorate the release of the album, frontman Christopher Hall joined Loudwire Nights host Toni Gonzalez to chat, and he explained why the band initially broke up back in 2002. “I think […]]]>

Stabbing Westward is back with chasing ghosts, their brand new album, which is out today (March 18), and is their first since 2001. To commemorate the release of the album, frontman Christopher Hall joined Loudwire Nights host Toni Gonzalez to chat, and he explained why the band initially broke up back in 2002.

“I think a lot of things happened simultaneously. The music industry was collapsing, it was true – 2000 is just when Napster and music downloads were just at an all-time high, and the record labels They were hemorrhaging money They weren’t selling For a while they had a monopoly on $15 CD’s so first they made money and then when people found out about MP3s they got said, ‘Oh, we can have all the recorded songs for free if I just want to spend 72 hours straight drinking Mountain Dew and downloading songs,'” Hall recalled.

Due to the lack of revenue the labels were getting, they started dropping bands, and Stabbing Westward was one of the victims dropped by Columbia. They found out about the news before the release of their fourth album, which Hall said put a lot of stress on himself and his bandmates.

Nevertheless, the band persisted and landed another recording contract on an independent label, which the singer identifies as when the dynamic within the band really started to get messy.

“There were people outside the band who were whispering in our ears, saying things like, ‘If you changed your sound, you could be a lot bigger than you are now. You should have been a lot bigger than you are not.’ The people in the band were kind of okay with that, so there was a lot of pressure to try and reinvent the band, and then a couple of us were like, ‘No, we think we should just be who we are, we’ve got a good, solid fan base. Let’s hang on to them, let’s not want more of them, “and that kind of pulled the bands in two different directions,” Hall continued.

Stabbing Westward released their self-titled fourth album through Koch Entertainment, which was acquired by Entertainment One in 2005. Hall noted that the album, indeed, sounded different, and that it was not successful for them. This only heightened the tensions between the band members, as some of them had pushed for a new sound, while others had not.

The band reunited for a tour in 2016 to celebrate their 30th anniversary as a band, but they had no plans to make the reunion permanent at that time. However, at the end of 2019, they announced that a new EP titled dead and gone would be released in early 2020. In the fall of 2021, they performed a handful of shows, then dropped the song “I Am Nothing”.

Now, chasing ghosts is available everywhere. Stream the album below and tune into Loudwire Nights tonight at 7 p.m. ET to hear more reunion and album details.

Loudwire Nights with Toni Gonzalez airs nightly starting at 7 p.m. ET. You can connect anytime, from anywhere here or by downloading the Loudwire app.

Top 90 Hard Rock + Metal Albums of the 1990s


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Band of brothers bring psychedelic rock to life https://evolutioninternational.net/band-of-brothers-bring-psychedelic-rock-to-life/ Tue, 08 Mar 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://evolutioninternational.net/band-of-brothers-bring-psychedelic-rock-to-life/ The Drew and Luke duo, consisting of Thornton senior Drew Cooper and his younger brother Luke Cooper, have gone from singing backstage to full-fledged rock band, playing various shows around LA (Photo courtesy courtesy of Drew & Luke) Psychedelic rock duo Drew & Luke aren’t just bandmates offering an electric combination of guitar and harmonica […]]]>
The Drew and Luke duo, consisting of Thornton senior Drew Cooper and his younger brother Luke Cooper, have gone from singing backstage to full-fledged rock band, playing various shows around LA (Photo courtesy courtesy of Drew & Luke)

Psychedelic rock duo Drew & Luke aren’t just bandmates offering an electric combination of guitar and harmonica – they’re also brothers. In some cases, growing up with a younger sibling means constant brawling and endless backseat fights, but that wasn’t the case for Drew Cooper, a senior music industry tycoon.

Hailing from Philadelphia, Drew and his younger brother Luke, a student at Santa Monica College, have been producing music in a variety of genres for years. Their latest musical adventure occurred as a psychedelic rock band, inspired by the classic rock scene of the late 60s and early 70s. From sound to style, the duo seem to have it all figured out.

However, finding their way to the hip music bar scenes of downtown Los Angeles was not a straight or easy path. It took many years of instrumental practice, experimenting with genre cultures, and practicing audience engagement for the Cooper brothers to get to where they are now. First, of course, they needed the spark of inspiration.

That spark came when the brothers were young, strapped into the backseat of their mother’s car on road trips. It was there, along with the music their mother was playing on the car radio, that they began to develop a love for rock.

“She would play a bunch of old music – Grateful Dead, the Stones, that sort of thing – and quiz us on who sang each song. I was never very good at it,” Luke said. “But she used those long car rides with a captive audience to teach us good music.”

Soon after, Drew and Luke began to dabble in making music themselves, though their early creations differed greatly from what they had heard on those long car rides. Instead, they poured their creativity into producing electronic dance music, naming themselves “CPR,” their vowel-less surname.

Benji Bacharach, a senior psychology major, recalls being roommates with Drew during their freshman year at USC and seeing the dedication with which Drew and Luke collaborated on their music. Hearing the brothers constantly talk about their projects over the phone and experiencing many of their EDM performances live, Bacharach understood the shared dynamic between the duo.

“Luke has always been very good at… creating different music. He would simply say, “I can make you a cool song in five minutes, just give me a second,” Bacharach said. “Drew has always been very good at DJing and able to get a crowd moving… Everyone loved their sound and listened to them.”

Amid the pandemic, however, with the inability to perform live shows, the duo took the opportunity to test out a different style. Returning to the music that had inspired them, Drew and Luke began to create music more in line with what their mother had taught them to love all those years ago.

“We kind of went back to the music of our mother’s teachings,” Drew said. “We just went deep diving and landed on ’60s blues and rock and roll… We picked up the guitar, started singing a little bit, and that’s how it started.”

As their image and musical style evolved, the brothers decided to trade the name CPR for a simpler title: the name “Drew & Luke”.

“We wanted something that was… very authentically our roots and who we are. What’s better than just being our names? There’s nothing hiding behind there,” Drew said.

Having honed their instrumentation skills and decided to the most specific degree what type of music they wanted to play, Drew & Luke are now fully addressing their identity as a psychedelic rock ‘n’ roll duo.

The evolution of their music has proven to be a fruitful endeavour, as the two have performed their latest music for live audiences in venues across Los Angeles, from one night at The Hotel Cafe to their three-week residency. at Harvard and Stone. Accompanying them on stage are friends and bandmates Blake Stamato, Nick Springer and Nick Imig – all students at USC.

The friends of the band, although surprised by the stark difference between the music of Drew & Luke and that of CPR, are greatly impressed by the dedication with which Drew and Luke have committed themselves to their evolution as musicians. The bluesy, late-’60s-inspired rock they play is full of energy, and the duo’s electrifying stage presence only adds fuel to the fire, from Drew’s solos to the electric to Luke jumping off the stage and dancing with the crowd.

“I really like their music now. I feel like it gives him a lot of energy. It’s fun to dance too,” said Bacharach, who is still Drew and Luke’s roommate four years later. “I love reaching out to them and supporting them. It’s starting to feel like a small community… You’ll see a lot of familiar faces there.

In the process of refining their new style, the dynamic of the brothers as bandmates, which Bacharach observed during their time producing EDM, continued to strengthen, with each of them having defined and embraced its role within the group.

“Luke is the leader of the band as the lead vocalist… He really has the main vision musically. Being his older brother, I’d say I’m the conductor in life. So I like to direct it differently,” Drew quipped.

Although Luke handles the organization and production and is the one who gets the band together for rehearsals, Drew takes the lead on the business side of things, contacting venues and arranging times and locations for the band to meet. produce.

“It ends up being a good dynamic,” Luke said. “We wouldn’t play without the gigs.”

Each handling a side of the bar, the duo enters March and April with exciting gigs lined up in venues old and new. While their community of loyal listeners continues to show up and dance, the duo hope more music lovers will come out to experience what they’ve created, regardless of labels or genre restrictions, but simply to enjoy music.

“We draw a lot of inspiration from late ’60s music… But I don’t care what you call it,” Luke said. “If you like what we play, then you like it. You like to come and experience it with us…I want to let you in because maybe I can put you on something.

From electronic dance music to classic rock and from Philadelphia to LA, it all comes down to a team of two brothers who are driven to create and perform, guaranteed to get their feet moving.

Information about Drew & Luke’s tour dates and locations can be found on the duo’s website.


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Jerry Cantrell – ‘Dirt’ was the most focused we’ve ever been https://evolutioninternational.net/jerry-cantrell-dirt-was-the-most-focused-weve-ever-been/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 21:31:49 +0000 https://evolutioninternational.net/jerry-cantrell-dirt-was-the-most-focused-weve-ever-been/ Alice in Chains’ dark and brooding sophomore effort Dirt was one of the definitive albums of the grunge era. As the album nears its 30th anniversary later this year, guitarist Jerry Cantrell reflected on when he and his bandmates made it, and claimed it was the “most focused” they have ever been. Corn Dirt came […]]]>

Alice in Chains’ dark and brooding sophomore effort Dirt was one of the definitive albums of the grunge era. As the album nears its 30th anniversary later this year, guitarist Jerry Cantrell reflected on when he and his bandmates made it, and claimed it was the “most focused” they have ever been.

Corn Dirt came out after Nirvana It does not matter made the world start paying attention to Seattle, Alice was actually the first Seattle band of this period to have a Billboard 200 Top 50 album chart with their debut face lift, which was particularly popularized by the hit “Man in the Box”. So by the time its sequel was released in September 1992, grunge was already at the forefront of the music industry.

But it was much deeper and more serious than Face lift.

“Well, dark…it is what it is,” Cantrell said. metal hammer of Dirt. “It’s probably the most focused record we’ve ever been on, the most complete record we’ve done, it’s a brutal record with real strength, and I mean that in a really good way. People cared, he was talking about a time and a place, we really never punched What’s good and bad, it’s good artistically, but it’s bad because if you go to be that honest, you’ll have a hard time living it. It’s an incredible record, it’s probably our crowning achievement.

The record peaked at No. 6 on the Billboard 200 and is their most commercially successful album to date. However, they followed a string of chart-topping releases thereafter, including their 1994 EP pot of flies, which was the first EP in history to reach No. 1.

“In many ways, it may have become as definitive for our careers as Dirt. A lot of people really liked this EP, the only one to reach #1, it’s pretty wild,” the guitarist added. “We knocked Mariah Carey out of #1 – a proud feeling for us! She was married to Tommy Mottola, who was the president of our record label, so I’m sure it was a fun night at their house that week! Mariah says, ‘Who the fuck are these guys?!’ Haha!

“It was just a good window of five or six years where rock was king, and it doesn’t happen that much, when even pop people celebrate rock and that’s the number one thing. C was probably the last time that happened.”

Top 30 grunge albums of all time


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JPEGMAFIA continues their winning streak with EP ‘OFFLINE!’ – The Oswegonian https://evolutioninternational.net/jpegmafia-continues-their-winning-streak-with-ep-offline-the-oswegonian/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 00:51:05 +0000 https://evolutioninternational.net/jpegmafia-continues-their-winning-streak-with-ep-offline-the-oswegonian/ By Jarrad Wakefield When JPEGMAFIA released their third studio album “LP!” in October 2021, it came with some controversy. “Peggy” took to Twitter to tell his fans that he had to remove some songs from the album due to sample permission issues. However, the mafia members woke up to a wonderful surprise on February 23. […]]]>

By Jarrad Wakefield

When JPEGMAFIA released their third studio album “LP!” in October 2021, it came with some controversy. “Peggy” took to Twitter to tell his fans that he had to remove some songs from the album due to sample permission issues. However, the mafia members woke up to a wonderful surprise on February 23. That morning, JPEGMAFIA tweeted that he posted “HAZARD DUTY PAY!” streaming services. It was one of five tracks in total that had to be excluded from the streaming release of “LP!” due to sample clearance problems. However, these tracks were released on JPEGMAFIA’s YouTube and Soundcloud in a special “offline” version of the album.

On February 24, “OFFLINE!” was released on streaming services containing “HAZARD DUTY PAY!” and all previously “unreleased” tracks. “OFFLINE!” continues the incredible series of EPs and albums on which Peggy is present. It’s hard to describe what JPEGMAFIA sounds like to people who don’t listen to it or experimental hip hop in general. Peggy’s sounds and samples are eclectic and always everywhere. However, Peggy’s production on “LP!” and “OFFLINE!” tends to favor hard, industrial, lo-fi synths and drums under samples ranging from explosive to plush and understated.

“PAYMENT OF DANGER DUTIES!” is one of the best songs released by JPEGMAFIA. This track was the first single to be released during the launch of the album “LP!”, and it was enthusiastically received by fans and critics. Peggy molds and molds “Ain’t No Need to Worry” by The Winians and Anita Baker into an energetic and powerful banger. Peggy creates a sonic symphony by adding her booming drums and bright, lo-fi synths that shimmer through the mix. The chopped and reintroduced sample echoes the phrase “Sometimes we feel pain” that runs through the mix like hot fudge on a sundae. No punches are thrown lyrically as Peggy calls out rappers who falsely claim in the music industry throughout the track.

“DIKEMBÉ! is another EP highlight. JPEGMAFIA refers to NBA player Dikembe Mutombo as he tries to fight his demons and stay on top. Peggy’s production shines once again on this track. However, Peggy uses this song to loosen up her versatility in style. “DIKEMBÉ! is a subtle yet hard-hitting, groove-focused track from the EP. A haunting guitar sample intertwined with glitchy drums and fuzzy synths all contribute to the understated funky feel the song exudes. Peggy’s lyrics are like a dash of whipped cream on fresh apple pie. Its calm flow offers confident and uplifting bars to complement the richness of the rhythm.

JPEGMAFIA’s evolution in hip-hop is unmatched by nearly any artist in the genre. Releases such as “Veteran”, “All My Heroes Are Cornballs”, “EP!” and “EP2!” have seen Peggy evolve and change shape effortlessly into new sounds and aesthetics. On the back of this incredible and highly influential discography, “LP! and “OFFLINE!” marks a new era for JPEGMAFIA. Once again, the Baltimore artist has fused new styles into his ever-evolving work while remaining one of the most original musical artists of the past five years. Elements of lo-fi, R&B, chamber pop, and southern hip-hop are all more present than ever, especially in “OFFLINE!” The clearance and release of these tracks marks a massive victory for JPEGMAFIA and all musicians who use samples in their music. Peggy is now six out of six on major releases. Fans and critics alike will be eagerly awaiting the release of Peggy’s seventh major project to see if it can continue the streak.

Image of JPEGMAFIA by YouTube


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detailing the history and evolution of “group music” https://evolutioninternational.net/detailing-the-history-and-evolution-of-group-music/ Fri, 18 Feb 2022 05:25:00 +0000 https://evolutioninternational.net/detailing-the-history-and-evolution-of-group-music/ Haque Faruk and Milu Aman talk about their latest post February 18, 2022, 11:25 a.m. Last modification: February 18, 2022, 11:29 a.m. Banglar Rock Metal is set to launch at the Bangla Academy Book Fair. Photo: Collected “> Banglar Rock Metal is set to launch at the Bangla Academy Book Fair. Photo: Collected During the […]]]>

Haque Faruk and Milu Aman talk about their latest post

February 18, 2022, 11:25 a.m.

Last modification: February 18, 2022, 11:29 a.m.

Banglar Rock Metal is set to launch at the Bangla Academy Book Fair. Photo: Collected

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Banglar Rock Metal is set to launch at the Bangla Academy Book Fair. Photo: Collected

During the 1960s, during the pre-independence era of Bangladesh, there was a rise of rock music in the country. Bangladeshi artists took inspiration from British and American rock music and fused it with elements of classical Bangla music and ‘adhunik’ music of the time. This trend continued for the next six decades.

Over time, artists began to develop their own distinct sound. This type of music was popularly called “group music” in the country. The movement led to the creation of iconic bands such as LRB, Souls, Feedback, Feelings (currently known as Nagar Baul), and many more. From the 1970s to the 2000s, it became one of the country’s most popular musical genres.

Like many aspects of Bangladeshi culture, the phenomenon has remained largely undocumented.

However, writer and journalist Haque Faruk approached Milu Aman with a proposal in June last year that is set to change all that.

Together they are about to launch a book, Banglar Rock Metal, detailing the history and evolution of “group music”. Banglar Rock Metal is set to launch at the Bangla Academy Book Fair.

Faruk and Milu have been affiliated with the music industry for over two decades.

Haque Faruk and Milu Aman. Photo: courtesy

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Haque Faruk and Milu Aman.  Photo: courtesy

Haque Faruk and Milu Aman. Photo: courtesy

“The book is divided into two parts. Initially, we explored the history and evolution of the genre. However, we later decided to present profiles for each group to summarize their story,” Faruk told The BusinessStandard.

“We’ve listed the bands in chronological order,” Milu added.

Banglar Rock Metal has around 100 bands ranging from pre-independence bands such as ‘Iolites’ to newer ensembles like ‘Shonar Bangla Circus’.

“You see, as unfortunate as it may be, we don’t have enough records or archives to document the history of this musical movement. So if anyone wants to know which bands were active in 1993 or what was Miles’ original line-up, they can check it out here. I want this publication to be treated as a reference book,” Milu said.

Faruk and Milu undertook and completed Banglar Rock Metal in just eight months. But it was not an easy effort.

Haque Farouk. Photo: courtesy

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Haque Farouk.  Photo: courtesy

Haque Farouk. Photo: courtesy

“I spent five days at the National Archives of Bangladesh collecting information for the book. I would go there as soon as the place opened, I was their very first visitor. old newspapers and magazines until they close it at night,” Faruk said.

Some group profiles have also proven to be more difficult to create than others.

“Four of the original members of ‘Aces’ (one of the most influential heavy metal bands in Bangladesh) are currently residing in Canada. I had contacted them through Facebook. It took more than two months to compile their whole story,” Faruk continued.

“We are also extremely grateful to all the musicians for their invaluable help. I can’t name a single band that hasn’t cooperated with us throughout this endeavor. We even sent copies of our work back to each band for verification,” Milu added.

Faruk and Milu hope to release Banglar Rock Metal last week at the Book Fair. The book will be published and distributed by ‘Anyaprokash’.

Snowy Aman. Photo: Collected

Snowy Aman. Photo: Collected


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The new frontier of musical experiences https://evolutioninternational.net/the-new-frontier-of-musical-experiences/ Tue, 15 Feb 2022 01:25:00 +0000 https://evolutioninternational.net/the-new-frontier-of-musical-experiences/ Music and the metaverse come together. Over the past year, the music industry has eagerly begun its integration with Web3 technologies. This evolution not only changes the way music is consumed, but also the way fans interact with the industry. The global music industry is unavoidable. Whether it’s the top 40 hits playing through car […]]]>

Music and the metaverse come together. Over the past year, the music industry has eagerly begun its integration with Web3 technologies. This evolution not only changes the way music is consumed, but also the way fans interact with the industry.

The global music industry is unavoidable. Whether it’s the top 40 hits playing through car speakers, the backdrop of a restaurant dinner, or advertising, music is all around us.

Industry is closely linked to our contemporary society. It’s no surprise how easily it jumped onto Web3. This past year has been a great year for integration. Music industry giants such as Sony Entertainment have invested in non-fungible token (NFT) platforms. Major artists like Katy Perry and Eminem have backed blockchain-based music platforms.

Social media giant TikTok has integrated Audius, a blockchain-based music streaming platform, with its app. Many musicians who have used NFTs before believe they are a game-changer for their careers and communities.

However, the metaverse expansion is now at full speed. It’s not just in-market NFTs and digital wallets that connect fans and their music world. BeinCrypto spoke with two industry crossover insiders to better understand the impact of this musical metaverse evolution.

Oana Ruxandra is Chief Digital Officer & EVP of Business Development at Warner Music Group (WMG). The company just launched its own music-themed world in the Sandbox metaverse. Bryce Carr is Director of Creator Partnerships and Music at Rally.

Staging

Recently, Warner Music Group, one of the world’s leading music labels and entertainment conglomerates, took a big step into the metaverse. In partnership with Sandbox, the music label will create a music-themed world in the Sandbox metaverse. It will be a hybrid musical theme park and concert hall. Warner Music Group will host concerts and music experiences featuring the company’s roster of featured artists.

WMG is not the only major company to take such steps. Companies like Walmart and Microsoft are also investing in digital reality. However, WMG’s enterprise opens up a whole new frontier for metaverse fan and artist engagement.

Oana told BeInCrypto how the music industry is the perfect industry to foray into digital reality. “There are so many reasons why the music industry is transforming into a digital and virtual world,” Ruxandra said. “At the end of the day, music spans all territories, all media types and all platforms, across time.”

Additionally, she pointed out that the metaverse continues to grow. With this growth comes the opportunity to create value and genuine engagement. However, the way to do this is still a pioneering act. Even for a nearly 200-year veteran of the music industry.

“There are not many certainties in the evolution of the metaverse. One thing I know with absolute certainty is that music will be consumed more as our lives become more digital. More people will listen, more often and in a wider variety of formats. There is a huge opportunity in this development. As long as we are able to provide real value to our artists and their communities.

Building authenticity with innovation

As with any new technological innovation, big questions remain. How can a virtual world bring authenticity to what actually exists in reality. “Web1 brought us the Internet and a wealth of static information. Web2 made it easy to interact with communities through centralized platforms. Now, Web3 will provide a decentralized internet owned by users and builders and orchestrated by tokens. For content and consumption, Web3 will see a shift from current content (songs, video, streaming, interactivity, etc.) to a focus on fan engagement.

Ruxandra says WMG’s main focus is authenticity. “Everything we build in the Web3 space must be authentic, true to our artists, their fans, and the platform. We build and launch deliberately.

Besides Warner Music artists, others are also using the new Web3 features to create new channels for genuine connection. Rally is a platform specifically designed for artists – musicians in particular. They can launch social tokens and start building their musical digital reality.

Bryce Carr, Director of Creator Partnerships, commented on the new artist connectivity via Web3. He emphasized that the ability to use Web3 features, such as tokenization, is not restricted to those with ties to big league entities.

“Social tokens and NFTs have tremendous potential and implications for artists at every stage of their career, from emerging talent to megastars to cult classics and legacy artists,” Carr said. “Web3 not only gives artists a shiny new tool to play with, it provides an entirely new and fairer business model for fans and artists alike.”

Moreover, he said that the journey will be different for everyone. This is something Carr knows well. Previously, he worked in young artist development for music giant Fender Musical Instruments Corporation. “Different creators will find value in these elements depending on what is important to them.”

Music and symbolization of devotion

However, another example of an individual group working with such innovations is portugal man. Recently, the popular Grammy Award-winning band took their fandom to the next level with the release of a new single coinciding with a social token.

Their system rewards fans who pre-register the new track with $1 PTM of PTM Coin, their coin which launched over a year ago. To participate, fans simply need to create a free account on Rally, a platform where artists and their fan communities build shared digital economies powered by social tokens and digital goods and services. According to their Rally page, they have over 3,000 fans supporting their initiative via crypto.

With the increased generalization of the metaverse and other Web3 properties, these tokens are the new “fan clubs”. Except, as Carr points out, “artists and their fans own 100% of the digital economy they’ve created.”

“One of the most compelling things about social tokens is that artists can share value with their fan communities, instead of extracting it from them. Now fans can own a piece of the community they’ve built with other fans.

Previously, crypto-music pioneer Dylan Rhodes spoke with BeInCrypto and specifically addressed how music NFTs, tokens, and DAOs promote collectives.

“It’s an incredibly versatile tool: artists can integrate the token into their existing communities and can be implemented anywhere, both IRL and digital. The token is used as an authentication tool to unlock content , experiments, etc. – Bryce Carr Director of Creator Partnerships, Music at Rally

Music and creation of digital culture

As with every new development that arises from Web3 communities, anticipate growth. Businesses, artists, fans, developers will find out what works and what features to leave out. However, in doing so, a new digital culture will form.

It’s hard to anticipate. At this time, little is certain about how the culture of virtual reality concerts, sets, and other musical engagements will captivate audiences. We are about to understand how artists can connect with the future of their business. On the other hand, fans of all generations are grappling with the changes as their idols move forward in the meta-realm.

There is one thing Carr knows. Despite the rapid developments in the digital world, there is a time and a place for digital and live music.

“Nothing replaces live music. But digital spaces where fans can discover and create a culture around music have become equally, if not more, important for many artists. I’m excited to see how the line between live and virtual blends as technology evolves, while allowing artists to showcase their art however they choose.

Want to chat about music or something else? So join our Telegram group.

Warning

All information contained on our website is published in good faith and for general information purposes only. Any action the reader takes on the information found on our website is strictly at their own risk.



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Charese Fruge’ (@MCMediaonline) interviews Dominique Higdon | Women to Watch https://evolutioninternational.net/charese-fruge-mcmediaonline-interviews-dominique-higdon-women-to-watch/ Wed, 09 Feb 2022 09:21:44 +0000 https://evolutioninternational.net/charese-fruge-mcmediaonline-interviews-dominique-higdon-women-to-watch/ Dominique Higdon is currently Programming Specialist and Curator of Pandora’s Hip Hop Department, and Musical Director of Pandora Now on SiriusXM. One of her biggest hits was the relaunch of the “Women in Hip Hop” station which was promoted by Cardi B on her first relaunch. This station has grown from less than 300,000 monthly […]]]>

Dominique Higdon is currently Programming Specialist and Curator of Pandora’s Hip Hop Department, and Musical Director of Pandora Now on SiriusXM. One of her biggest hits was the relaunch of the “Women in Hip Hop” station which was promoted by Cardi B on her first relaunch. This station has grown from less than 300,000 monthly listeners to over 950,000 monthly listeners since the relaunch. His curriculum vitae and his experience are extremely impressive. The only way to describe it is “Badass!”

“Since joining the Pandora team, my focus has been on breaking through with emerging artists; I love seeing artists win,” says Higdon. “As a hip-hop scholar, I work with a dynamic team that has a passion for the streaming space and makes a practical impact on current and emerging artists in the genre. I love how my position in this department always keeps me on my side From station lineups and Hip Hop playlists to weekly meetings with record label reps, we strive to bring new and intriguing content to the Pandora music brand that will resonate with our listeners.

“As Music Director of Pandora Now on SiriusXM, my primary responsibility is to assist my PD, Joshua “J1″ Raiford and APD, Melony Torres, with rotations for the station,” Higdon explains. “Alongside my programming duties, I’ve also spearheaded the growth of Pandora Now SiriusXM’s social platforms by booking emerging artists to showcase their talents and music on the station’s Instagram Live series. Artists who have been featured in this series vary from Earthgang to Lil’ Migo.”

Dominique began her career in traditional radio in college. She had her own radio show at High Point University from 2011 to 2015. From 2012 to 2015, she also interned at WJMH (102 Jamz). “During my internship at 102 Jamz in Greensboro, NC, I worked with some amazing people who helped shape me and make me the person I am today: Waleed, Tap Money, Horse Rainy, Big Mo and many more,” she says. From 2015 to 2016, she interned at Radio One DC. “I started my internship for the ‘Russ Parr Morning Show’, she says, ‘I then became the local producer of the ‘Russ Parr Morning Show’. Following my time doing this, I interned for Neke Howse, former PD for 93.9 WKYS. During my internship with Neke, I learned the basics of radio programming which included: Music Master, Rotations, Staff Scheduling, and much more. In addition to my internship, I also worked as an on-board operator for 93.9 WKYS and Majic 102.3 and 92.7 during night shifts,” she explains. “I continued to gain experience as a producer, replacing ‘The Fam in the Morning’ with QuickSilva and Lil’ Mo every show.”

“After my internship with former 93.9 WKYS PD, Neke Howse, Kashon Powell, OM and VP/Programming, promoted me to Programming Assistant for the DC Market working under him. My responsibilities consisted of assisting with multiple tasks and projects for Radio One.DC Cluster and assisting new hires PD of 93.9

WKYS, Joshua “J1” Raiford when he took over the station after Neke left. While working under the direction of Kashon and J1, we have created and produced major events such as station concerts, award shows, community events benefiting non-profit organizations, and much more.

As a little girl, Dominique always knew what her purpose in life would be. “I knew my goal was to elevate and be a game changer in the music industry. Music has always been a passion of mine,” she says. “From visiting the radio station with my uncle, Russ Parr, at the time, to watching one of my favorite movies, ‘Brown Sugar’, I knew this industry was a space I wanted to explore and thrive,” she says. “I can’t say there’s only one person who has helped champion my radio career. I’m so lucky to have a tribe of friends and mentors who have supported me. helped me become the person I am today.” Russ Parr, Waleed, Tap Money, Horse Rainy, Neke Howse, Kashon Powell, Talya Johnson-Floyd, Quicksilva, Lil’ Mo, and my current boss, J1, have all been influential in my radio journey. Their genuine advice and helpful feedback taught me countless lessons that I still apply to my daily tasks and to my productivity in my current position. Not to mention that I previously worked as a programming assistant J1 at Radio One’s Hip and R&B station in Washington, DC, 93.9 WKYS, which is how I got to where I am today.

Having worked in both traditional radio and now satellite/streaming, I of course had to ask him the obvious question: “What is the advantage of satellite signals over traditional signals?” Higdon told me: “The advantages of satellite services are that they are easy to listen to. Satellite services are ad-free, mainly focus on music and are more aggressive when it comes to discovering new music and new artists. Traditional radio is more content driven. They have frequent commercials and breaks for jocks to talk during stop sets etc. as the music evolves.”

Dominique admits that business has been good for her so far. “I’ve always had a passion for breaking artist records and seeing them succeed. During my tenure in the industry, I’ve helped break records for major artists such as Lil’ Baby, Moneybagg Yo, City Girls, DJ Khaled, etc.” she says. “Not only am I constantly learning new programming skills, but I’ve also worked alongside a successful team during my time on the radio creating events ranging from concerts and award shows to experiential meet-and-greets with major artists,” says Higdon. “In the realm of streaming and satellite radio, one of my biggest successes so far has been the relaunch of our station ‘Women in Hip Hop’ in which Cardi B was one of the artists who helped promote the station. This was a huge win for me, as his relaunch promotion would contribute to significant growth and viewership for the station. Lastly, being selected as a member of the Recording Academy Class of 2021 was a simple reminder that my hard work is being noticed and recognized.”

Higdon admits that nothing worth fighting for comes without its challenges. “As we all know working in this industry can be a thankless job and at times in my career

I struggled with feeling neglected and not being properly compensated, she says. Persistence and a strong work ethic helped me realize that hard work will pay off. As my career continues to evolve, I am grateful to have gone through these hardships because they have helped me become the career woman I am today. It’s important to remember that it’s a marathon, not a sprint.”

“We can also all agree that the pandemic has had an emotional and mental impact on us for the past two years,” she adds. “Although we continue to go through this period of uncertainty, I feel like the pandemic has had a positive impact on my life. I have prioritized creating healthy fitness goals and normalizing self-care. Yoga and daily meditation have been key exercises that have helped me manage my stress and anxiety,” says Higdon. “Although I’m a perfectionist and put a lot of pressure on myself, during these times, I take time to talk with my family and friends, volunteer in the community, and stay active with my health and fitness goals to help with balance in my daily routines. I also like to dress up in my favorite pair of heels and go to restaurants because #selfcare. Self-care is one of the most important principles for balancing mental peace in a fast-paced industry.

As a programmer, Dominique understands the lack of gender equality in management, especially on the programming side. She sees a great need to encourage more women to take on these kinds of roles in the future. “Women are the biggest consumers of music, and we need to capitalize on that,” she says. “Artists and their teams rely heavily on the feedback and musical insight of women. We play such an important role in this male-dominated part of the industry, so I think it’s important to have more female programmers and curators. In my experience, the women’s program, and curated mostly on the R&B side, so I would like more women to join me in Hip Hop.”

As for what awaits Dominique in 2022, “While we are still in the midst of a life-changing pandemic, I am extremely optimistic and excited for what lies ahead this year,” she says. “I want to continue breaking more emerging artists while gaining more traction and recognition for the Pandora/SiriusXM brand. I have also made it a personal goal to give back to the community and share my journey with women who want to get started in this industry. On March 5, I have the pleasure of speaking at the 6th Annual Women in Radio Conference about my background in music. I am so grateful for this opportunity and look forward to providing some insight to women who are hoping to get their start in this industry.”

Higdon added: “Major kudos to Cathey Hughes for leading the way in black radio and my time in her business. Russ Parr, J1, Kashon Powell, Colby Cob, Waleed, Tap Money, Horse Rainy, Neke Howse, Sherri Warren, Akil, Kelson, DJ Gemini, Wilt Wallace, Keinon Johnson, EZ Street, Monique Davis-Cary, Chris Green, Jackie Paige, Paris Nicole, Leah Bekele, Amir Boyd, Brittany O, Jaosn, Troy Marshall, Danielle Lott, Damon Lott, Lorel, Angie Ange, Geo Bivens, Madelne Woods, Janine Brunson-Johnson, Talya Johnson-Floyd, Quicksilva, Lil Mo , Melony Torres and many others have all been influential in my radio journey.

Follow Dominique Higdon on Instagram: @fancydomo



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Thom LaFond Talks Solo Album ‘The Moon Leans In’ – The Rocky Mountain Collegian https://evolutioninternational.net/thom-lafond-talks-solo-album-the-moon-leans-in-the-rocky-mountain-collegian/ Thu, 27 Jan 2022 06:46:45 +0000 https://evolutioninternational.net/thom-lafond-talks-solo-album-the-moon-leans-in-the-rocky-mountain-collegian/ LaFond’s next concert and album release party will be at the Supermoon in Boulder on February 3, with opening act by Dan Hochman. (Graphic illustration by Lee Billiot | The Collegian) Named for his time spent under the stars while recording, Thom LaFond’s debut album “The Moon Leans In” crosses genres to create melodies that […]]]>

LaFond’s next concert and album release party will be at the Supermoon in Boulder on February 3, with opening act by Dan Hochman.

(Graphic illustration by Lee Billiot | The Collegian)

Named for his time spent under the stars while recording, Thom LaFond’s debut album “The Moon Leans In” crosses genres to create melodies that stick with listeners. Recorded in rural Lyon, Colorado, LaFond said his album was inspired by musicians like Mac Miller and Billie Holiday.

LaFond released the first single from the album, “Hurry” in mid-2021. The song features a slow, steady drum beat with LaFond’s soft, soothing vocals. It’s reminiscent of Hozier’s verses and has a unique Colorado feel.

“I think I’ve found a genre that I can kind of call my own. But this album wasn’t about that. It was more about capturing the things I like to do and the things I hear. -Thom LaFond, singer-songwriter

With roots in swing and indie music, LaFond’s new album features songs written at various points in his life. He describes them as a “fruit salad” of works from his career.

“A lot of the songs on (the) album are up to 10 years old,” LaFond said. “Some of them I wrote for the studio or a week before or the day I recorded the vocals.”

LaFond’s musical upbringing involved playing guitar, despite the new album excluding guitar solos and instead focusing on lyrics. The new album shows an evolution in his writing and performing style since his band, Banshee Tree, released their album in August 2021.

In his recent work with Banshee Tree, LaFond’s swing roots and indie influences are incredibly present. In several songs of “The Moon Leans In”, listeners can notice his new influences and changing genre.

Despite interest from across the music industry in using genre as a method of branding, LaFond said his label gave him some freedom to play a variety of genres.

“I think I’ve found a genre that I can kind of call my own,” LaFond said. “But this album wasn’t about that. It was more about capturing the things I like to do and the things I hear.

As LaFond strives to establish himself as a new musical artist, having the opportunity to work with his own perceptions of his music rather than meeting the expectations of a larger producer has allowed him to deliver an incredibly intimate product by compared to many other new independent albums. .

Along with new influences, LaFond worked with analog recording devices, placing new limits on how he could produce the sounds on the album. While he would usually have layered vocals and instruments separately, he found himself faced with a new challenge that shaped the dreamlike essence of the album.

“When I got into the logistics of creating the budget and finding the musicians, I realized I had certain limitations,” LaFond said. “The arrangements kind of came out of trying to strip the album down to recording everything with four people live.”

The result of recording the album live is a melodic sound that quickly hooks listeners and carries them through each song. All of the tracks on the album work together despite the genre changes.

“In a Hurry” was recorded at LaFond with layering techniques, and even without those techniques, it brings a romantic energy. He is delighted to release new songs from the album, which feature a stripped-down live sound that disregards the heavy use of effects often seen in indie music.

Much of the album was shaped by LaFond’s time spent in nature while writing the album, with his favorite recent gig being at the Gold Hill Inn in Boulder, Colorado, which features a log cabin vibe. logs.

LaFond’s next concert and album release party will be at Supermoon in Boulder on February 3 with opening act by Dan Hochman. His album can be found on Spotify and SoundCloud February 3, and LaFond’s single, “Hurry”, is available now.

Contact Kota Babcock at entertainment@collegian.com or on Twitter @KotaBabcock.



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The Riddle of Morgan Wallen – The New York Times https://evolutioninternational.net/the-riddle-of-morgan-wallen-the-new-york-times/ Sat, 22 Jan 2022 06:05:25 +0000 https://evolutioninternational.net/the-riddle-of-morgan-wallen-the-new-york-times/ When Strahan asked Wallen if country music had a race problem, all Wallen could do was shrug, “It would seem so, yes. I didn’t really sit down and think about it. It was a frankly honest response from a star who probably hadn’t previously considered the plight of black performers in Nashville, or perhaps black […]]]>

When Strahan asked Wallen if country music had a race problem, all Wallen could do was shrug, “It would seem so, yes. I didn’t really sit down and think about it. It was a frankly honest response from a star who probably hadn’t previously considered the plight of black performers in Nashville, or perhaps black people in general.

His use of insult echoed the ruthless and thoughtless way in which many white Americans toy with the signifiers of black culture without any sense of their history. It was flippant and, in Wallen’s description of its use among friends, a feel-good transgression for private spaces.

The number of white pop stars who have been found to have used this epithet is staggering, simply because it doesn’t suck. In addition to Wallen, there are at least three: Eminem and Justin Bieber, both of whom were surprised by recordings from their youth that surfaced when they were famous. And then there’s John Mayer, perhaps the most telling example, who said it in a 2010 Playboy interview. Each faced condemnation, but the damage to their careers was brief, surprising especially because all three work in traditionally black idioms. But while Wallen expresses his love of hip-hop and has occasionally immersed himself in rap singing, he rarely nods directly to contemporary black music in his own songs, and country itself has largely erased the dark foundations of the art form of its self-historicization.

Prior to the January incident, Wallen generally avoided presenting his politics openly, unlike some of his peers in the genre. In 2020, he was kicked off the show “Saturday Night Live” for violating its Covid-19 protocols. (His appearance has been postponed.) In November 2020, in response to public celebrations of Joe Biden’s election, he wrote on Instagram that “If it’s OK for us to party in the streets without ‘social distancing’, then we can book shows right now.” At the end of last year, the podcast Hosted by his collaborator Ernest, he and the host poked fun at President Biden’s mannerisms.

But the spike in Wallen’s album sales immediately after video of the incident was made public prompted and perhaps necessitated his emergence as a cudgel of the culture war. Listeners leaned on Wallen’s music as a sort of protest against the way he was treated by the country music industry. (Wallen said he donated $500,000 to black charities, the approximate amount he made from his spike in sales; how much money has reached these organizations has been disputed.)

Wallen, country music’s biggest star, was designed to be the kind of personality that extends the genre’s reach into the pop mainstream, akin to Shania Twain or Garth Brooks. It seems unlikely now.


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Queens’ Nadine Velazquez on Valeria Mendez’s complicated evolution https://evolutioninternational.net/queens-nadine-velazquez-on-valeria-mendezs-complicated-evolution/ Wed, 19 Jan 2022 02:50:40 +0000 https://evolutioninternational.net/queens-nadine-velazquez-on-valeria-mendezs-complicated-evolution/ Listen to this article When we look at the music industry today, we are often shown the expensive clothes, the glamorous jewelry, the houses way too big for one person to live in, and the big sums of money that one person average will probably never win in his lifetime. But who is the artist […]]]>
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When we look at the music industry today, we are often shown the expensive clothes, the glamorous jewelry, the houses way too big for one person to live in, and the big sums of money that one person average will probably never win in his lifetime. But who is the artist without material things? stripped of stylists, entourage and adoring fans? Who is the person who removes makeup and goes to bed alone?

On ABC’s hit show queens, this is the life of Valeria “Buter Pecan” Mendez, a Puerto Rican rapper part of the Queens dynasty, who welcomes fame, entourage, money and personality who screams “look at my life, I have everything “. However, after leaving Queens, Valeria spent her life seeking more fame and success (even if she had to poison her co-star’s drink) in hopes of escaping a past filled with abandonment. Even with her daytime chat scandal behind her and with the success of the Queens reunion, Valeria’s trauma and vulnerability quickly caught up with her in the form of a con artist posing as her mother, the attempted murder of her best friend Briana and learning her real mother died years ago.

Instead of facing and dealing with her pain, Valeria found escape through Thomas, a man she didn’t know but quickly married on a whim. Was it passion that drew her to him or the possibility that someone might love him even for a fleeting moment? While it’s easy for Valeria to run away from her problems and this marriage, she has decided (for now) to face the consequences of her actions and open up to a stranger. And while it’s still too early to know if Valeria can grow up to love Thomas, it’s more important that Valeria grows up to love herself.

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The Koalition spoke to actress Nadine Velazquez about Valeria’s growth, marriage, solo career and what fans can expect this season.

“I think Valeria should treat [her mother’s death] at some point, but we don’t see that this first season, maybe season two, but we’re moving really really fast [for]first season.

She’s heartbroken and then that love comes into her life, and it’s genuine, it’s not like Valeria, especially with relationships. We really just wanted to create an opening for love. [For Valeria], like Bree life is short; Bree almost died alive. [For Valeria], life is short, life has changed so fast. [She decides] “I’m gonna live for today, I’m just gonna jump in and go ahead and do this now. I like Thomas. [He] seems to be very authentic.

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Thrown into the foster system from an early age, Valeria has always struggled with the concept of love; only telling two people; instead, she found love in success. But what is love according to Valeria? Living so long without her, can Valeria recognize true love when he looks her in the face? While it’s easy for one person to say “I love you”, for Valeria those words carry weight and mean she doesn’t move lightly.

It’s important that she says (or doesn’t say) “I love you because she’s only said it to two people in her entire life. It was meant to be so meaningful and special. You don’t say it just because I say it. Say it because it’s in your heart to say it, say it because you can’t help but say it and not because I ask.

“I think we’ll continue to see how Valeria pushes back on that relationship. I think it’s still going to be a source of conflict for her going into Season 1. [but] we can just see that he brings stability, consistency, and a kind of love and strength that she’s just not used to. I think they definitely have a power struggle. You will see that and then finally, she will have to make a choice for herself. She still has so much to develop and if we get a season two that would be really great to explore because part of what I loved about the audience response to Valeria is so many women saying ” I’m just like that” and part of my intuition with this character was to represent women who are like that.

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“I love that we created Valeria to have this inner conflict that she’s kind of aware of but doesn’t really know how to be consistent. She knows how to talk about it but deep down she doesn’t really know how to to live.

For more on Valeria and Nadine Velazquez, watch our full interview in the video above.


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